Blog

If you’re a family member supporting a loved one with a developmental disability in Ontario, you know the mantra.  You can’t rely on the government to do it all for you.  AND you can’t do it all by yourself.  So where does that leave us?  With networking, collaborating and partnering, that’s where!

I’m a bit of an op-ed troll.  Actually, if truth be told, I troll blogs, too.  I don’t have any particular favourites.  But I’m always interested in how businesses are putting their best foot forward and hiring individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities.  And once they make the decision – and put the time and effort into supporting the decision – they discover that it’s just good business. 

I’m really excited!  I know two finalists for Everyday Political Citizen of the Year.  Hey, you may know them too.  Heather Rose and Kim Peterson are both Ottawa moms with children who have autism.  And they are extraordinarily determined.  They realized that a lot of the information that they have been accumulating on how to navigate THE SYSTEM to acquire services needed to be shared.  So that’s what they did. 

First Gift As we began preparing for Giving Tuesday and thinking about how to encourage you to help Laundry Matters pay its gas bill for the year, I started thinking about the first time I bought a present for my mother.

On His Own

Sometimes families make mistakes for the best possible reasons. And what better reason could there be than wanting to protect your adult son, daughter or sibling with a developmental disability. There might be only one fly in the ointment though. That individual doesn’t really want protecting.

You know, sometimes I read something and I say to myself – there’s no point writing anything else. This person has said it all. When I read this column in the Huffington Post’s Australia edition, it so reminded me of my daughter when she was little. People would say to her “you are disabled” and she would cock her head and stare at them and say “No, my name is Melissa.”

Just read this column if you haven’t already. I have nothing else to say. http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/lucinda-bain/im-not-cute-im-a-woman-a-_...

It’s torture for many teens and young adults – the first big dance. Do you remember it? I sure do. What to wear? What to talk about? Will I dance well enough? Will he kiss me? Yup, the whole nine yards of uncertainty and emotion.

How to Dance in Ohio

It’s torture for many teens and young adults – the first big dance. Do you remember it? I sure do. What to wear? What to talk about? Will I dance well enough? Will he kiss me? Yup, the whole nine yards of uncertainty and emotion.

Alberta and Ontario have many things in common. One of those things, unfortunately, is the fallout of the death of an adult individual with developmental disabilities. In both cases, the death should never have happened.

Many people in Ontario have read the results in the recent inquest into the death of Guy Mitchell. If you haven’t, the most recent issue of Spotlight on Transformation summarizes it here: (http://www.familiesmattercoop.ca/story/spotlight-on-transformation-issue...)

Do you ever feel as if you’re living in a parallel universe? That there’s another world that’s moving a little faster and is coming to grips with the 21st century just a little bit more quickly? That’s how I felt when I came across this headline, shortly after weaving past a gauntlet of very angry taxi drivers on a return trip from the Ottawa airport. The dateline on the article was Los Angeles. The headline: Uber…Under Pressure to Improve Accessibility.

Syndicate content

Another U7 Solutions - Web-based solutions to everyday business problems. solution.